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no coakynuts for guessing


no coakynuts for guessing

doubt there won`t be many members that`ll fail to recognise these!




    young ronnie
    Nov 23 2008 11:33 PM
    The dreaded K word ??

    restlesswave
    Nov 23 2008 11:41 PM
    two burtonport skippers were talking one day one complaining how much his gardner overhaul cost, when he named the price the other one said-it would cost me that just to phone kelvin`s in glasgow!!

    young ronnie
    Nov 23 2008 11:50 PM
    Would I be right in saying that years ago they had a tax on the spares(the only engines that did),or am I getting mixed up? Seem to remember the old man on about that.The price of what's sitting there would be a big big weeks work if you had to buy it new....A Kelvin cemetery makes a change...it was usually the poor bu**ers that had them in their boats that ended up in early graves lol

    Barry McCrindle
    Nov 23 2008 11:53 PM
    The Kelvin's weren't that bad, Huntress still had her in her when she was scrapped after 30 years, and to be honest I would rather work on a kelvin, than these high revving pieces of crap that CAT and Cummins churn out, first yacht i went to after leaving commercial side, you needed a sodding lap top to change an injector

    restlesswave
    Nov 23 2008 11:54 PM
    why would that not surprise me!-also where this pic was taken there must be at least 8, R6 kelvins to match these boxes.-all ex calmac ferries.

    young ronnie
    Nov 23 2008 11:57 PM
    The more modern Kelvins were good right enough,we had a T8 in the Storjen and it would have pulled the Devil out his den,but the old K series ??...give ye fekkin nightmares even now !!

    Barry McCrindle
    Nov 24 2008 12:00 AM
    Only ever really seen the T8, think it was Jim Black the MD at Kelvin said to my dad the T8's could be completely taken apart with a hammer and a drift, which is just about believable

    restlesswave
    Nov 24 2008 12:04 AM
    yeah the t`s were great engines and these were great boxes everything was great till you had to buy something-then you`d need to own a bank! yeah barry i have to agree i have done bits and pieces of work on these engines and we knew all their faults and how to cure them and it wasn`t a watchmakers job to put them together.

    young ronnie
    Nov 24 2008 12:10 AM
    When we were doing the gear-box on our T8 (burned out the clutch plates)  Andy Bruce of Seaward Engineering did it along with an American lad who was engineer on a yacht in Florida.The T8 in the yacht had the same trouble and the owner flew the engineer over here to see the job being done and he was going to do his one when he got back. The owner was a millionaire and as his engineer said he was paying his wages so expected him to be able to do the job himself.A great guy was "Hank the Yank" as we called him (original name we thought we gave him lol)and he got stuck in with the rest of us. Cannae remember the final bill back then around 1973 but it wasn't cheap.

    quiet waters
    Nov 24 2008 10:21 AM
    oh dear!!! am i the only one that didn't know what they were? well not exactly anyway, but then i'm one of these poor souls that only ever worked with cats and cummins except for 10 months with a volvo before it blew up on me. and heres me never claimed to be the most mechanical of people, i can't even remember the names of parts of an engine, terrible memory for names of things, but the cat we had i could strip it down and rebuild it blindfolded, in much the same way as you could probably train a monkey, got paid the same way too!!!!
    years of being made to act as "boy" for a real engineer anytime anything needed done, my old man called it "watch and you might learn something" i did, when i was older i learned that if you didn't spend every minute of every day right there in the engineroom with the engineer then you'd be paying a hefty hourly rate for a boy just to pass spanners to the wee man!!! from memory it was 28 an hour for a boy who was probably being paid 3!!!!